Multiple login in Yahoo Without Using any Software

Multiple login in yahoo Without Using any Software
You can login with multiple id’s on the same yahoo messenger without any download or patch .
Follow these steps :
1. Go to Start —-> Run . Type regedit, then enter .
2.Navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER ——–> Software —>yahoo —–>pager—->Test
3.On the right page , right-click and choose new Dword value .
4.Rename it as Plural.
5.Double click and assign a decimal value of 1.
Its done!!
Now close registry and restart yahoo messenger and try Multiple Login

Yahoo_Messenger_Multiple login in Yahoo Without Using any Software

You can login with multiple id’s on the same yahoo messenger without any download or patch .

Follow these steps :

1. Go to Start —-> Run . Type regedit, then enter .

re

2.Navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER ——–> Software —>yahoo —–>pager—->Test

3.On the right page , right-click and choose new Dword value .

4.Rename it as Plural.

5.Double click and assign a decimal value of 1.

Its done!!

Now close registry and restart yahoo messenger and try Multiple Login

Twitter Adding Location to microblogging service

sshot-1Twitter is adding location to its globally popular microblogging service in a move that will let people see where “tweets” are coming from.

“We’re gearing up to launch a new feature which makes Twitter truly location-aware,” Twitter co-founder Biz Stone said in a message posted Thursday at the San Francisco-based Internet firm’s website.

“A new API (application programming interface) will allow developers to add latitude and longitude to any tweet.”

Accurate “tweet-level” location data would let people switch from tracking messages based on individuals or topics to following microblogging by neighborhood or city, according to Stone.

sshot-2“It’s easy to imagine how this might be interesting in an event like a concert or something more dramatic like an earthquake,” Stone wrote.

“There will likely be many use cases we haven’t even thought of yet which is part of what makes this so exciting.”

Outside software developers who create applications for Twitter will be able to experiment with the location API prior to the feature being added to the microblogging service.

Twitter users interested in letting their whereabouts be known will need to activate the new feature, which will be “off” as a default setting. Exact location data will not be stored for extended periods, according to Twitter.

“If people do opt-in to sharing location on a tweet-by-tweet basis, compelling context will be added to each burst of information,” Stone said.

Outside developers have been incorporating location into Twitter applications “for some time despite having access to only a rudimentary level” of support, according to the microblogging service.

“Most of the location-based projects we see are built using the simple, account-level location field folks can fill out as part of their profile,” Stone said. “Since anything can be written in this field, it’s interesting but not very dependable.”

An everyday chatting tool for many, Twitter has also become a weapon for dissidents to circumvent censorship in places where freedom of speech is suppressed.

How to Unlock The Supersecret Administrator Account For Vista

Deep inside the bowels of Windows Vista, there’s a secret Administrator account, and it’s different from the normal administrator account you most likely have set up on your PC. This Administrator account is not part of the Administrator group. (Confused yet? You should be.) It’s a kind of superadministrator, akin to the root account in Unix, and by default it’s turned off and hidden. (In describing this tut, i’ll always use the capital “A” for the secret Administrator account, and a lowercase “a” for a normal administrator account.)
In versions of Windows before Windows Vista, the Administrator account wasn’t hidden, and many people used it as their main or only account. This Administrator account had full rights over the computer.
In Windows Vista, Microsoft changed that. In Vista, the Administrator account is not subject to UAC, but normal administrator accounts are. So the Administrator can make any changes to the system and will see no UAC prompts.
Turning on the Administrator account is straightforward. First, open command prompt by typing cmd into the run box on the Start menu, or by right-clicking the command prompt icon that appears at the top of the Start menu, then selecting Run as administrator.
Then enter this command and press Enter:
Net user administrator /active:yes
From now on, the Administrator account will appear as an option on the Welcome screen, along with any user accounts you may have set up. Use it like any other account. Be aware that it won’t have a password yet, so it’s a good idea to set a password for it.
If you want to disable the account and hide it, enter this command at an elevated command prompt and press Enter:
Net user administrator /active:no

vista_logo21Deep inside the bowels of Windows Vista, there’s a secret Administrator account, and it’s different from the normal administrator account you most likely have set up on your PC. This Administrator account is not part of the Administrator group. (Confused yet? You should be.) It’s a kind of superadministrator, akin to the root account in Unix, and by default it’s turned off and hidden. (In describing this tut, i’ll always use the capital ‘A’ for the secret Administrator account, and a lowercase ‘a’ for a normal administrator account.)

In versions of Windows before Windows Vista, the Administrator account wasn’t hidden, and many people used it as their main or only account. This Administrator account had full rights over the computer.

In Windows Vista, Microsoft changed that. In Vista, the Administrator account is not subject to UAC, but normal administrator accounts are. So the Administrator can make any changes to the system and will see no UAC prompts.

Turning on the Administrator account is straightforward. First, open command prompt by typing cmd into the run box on the Start menu, or by right-clicking the command prompt icon that appears at the top of the Start menu, then selecting Run as administrator.

Then enter this command and press Enter:

Net user administrator /active:yes

From now on, the Administrator account will appear as an option on the Welcome screen, along with any user accounts you may have set up. Use it like any other account. Be aware that it won’t have a password yet, so it’s a good idea to set a password for it.

If you want to disable the account and hide it, enter this command at an elevated command prompt and press Enter:

Net user administrator /active:no